Skip to Navigation

ABOUT MHU

Feb 16, 2010

Respiratory Disease: Diagnosis, Treatment and Prevention

Dr. Hal SchottView Recorded Webcast

Date
February 16, 2010 | 7:00 PM ET

Speaker
Dr. Hal Schott | Michigan State University

Summary
Can my horse get the swine flu? Why does my horse cough at the beginning of exercise?  Can I catch strangles from my horse? Why do racehorses bleed rom their noses? These and other questions will be answered in this webcast!

Respiratory disease in the horse can broadly be categorized as infectious and non-infectious in cause. Infections can be caused by bacteria and viruses but one of the greatest risks for severe bacterial pneumonia is long distance transport. Non-infectious problems include those that may narrow or collapse the upper airway limiting the amount of air that can pass to the lungs as well as the chronic lung disease known as heaves.

This webcast will emphasize practical information along with things you can do to try to prevent respiratory disease in your horse as well as limit the damage that can happen once disease may have started.

Presenter Information
Dr. Schott received his DVM degree in 1984 from The Ohio State University College of Veterinary Medicine.  He started his career with three years in private equine practice in Southern California. Dr. Schott subsequently pursued advanced training by completing a residency in equine internal medicine and a Ph.D. in equine exercise physiology at Washington State University.  Since 1995, Dr. Schott has been an equine medicine clinician at Michigan State University with a strong clinical interest in urinary tract disorders, respiratory disease, and endocrinological disorders. In addition, he continues to pursue a research interest of fluid and electrolyte balance in endurance horses.

Dr. Schott played polo while growing up in the greater Cincinnati area and then continued to play polo at Cornell University and in Lexington Kentucky during his college and veterinary school years.  Life has become too busy to continue this sport but Dr. Schott now enjoys working with his 8-year-old daughter teaching her to ride the best pony in the world “Rusty”.

Sign up for MHU's and eXtension's HorseQuest e-Tips Newsletter for up-to-date information about our webcasts!